Richard Rosen Weekend Workshop

Weekend Workshop with Richard Rosen

Richard Rosen

August 11- 13, 2017

One Small Step for Yoga—One Giant Step for You

REGISTER

Join us in welcoming Richard Rosen August 11-13, 2017.

This remarkable workshop will deepen your practice, enrich your understanding of yoga, and inspire you to learn who you truly are.

Richard Rosen is one of the most respected, knowledgeable, wise, and beloved yoga teachers in the U.S. and abroad, and One Center is extremely fortunate to have lured him to Asheville! His classes combine meticulous asana and pranayama instruction, an impressive understanding of yoga philosophy, an engaging teaching style, and his trademark dry sense of humor. Appropriate for advanced beginners and experienced students and teachers.

“Richard Rosen’s wisdom seeps into his teaching, regardless of the subject matter. Using asana as a starting point, he encourages each of us to explore our own consciousness and to join with others to bring about a world shift in perspective.” — Cindy Dollar

“I believe yoga helps you look at yourself in a clean, clear way. And understanding who you are helps you to live more successfully, becoming both healthier and happier.” –Richard Rosen

Friday ~ 6 – 8 pm
Alignment Yoga: Principles and Practice

Holding trunk, head, and neck even, motionless, and steady … he [the yogi] should sit.

 –Bhagavad Gita 6.13, 15

We might imagine the emphasis on alignment in asana is a 20th-century innovation. But in fact, as we can see in the quote above from the Gita, yogis have been aware of the importance of alignment for at least 1600 years. Why is this? When a yogi sits for meditation or breathing, any kind of movement (even including the tongue and eyes) disturbs the delicate balance of the brain and breaks the intense concentration needed for her to approach self-understanding. So a properly aligned position allows the yogi to remain “steady and comfortable,” as Patanjali characterized the perfect asana, for long periods of time in deepest concentration. But even more, aligned sitting is in itself conducive to meditation and transformative breathing.

In this session, through a variety of exercises, we’ll work with and experience the most important principles of physical alignment, then apply them to a standing pose extravaganza. Why standing poses? The Iyengar system assumes that the 20-odd standing poses are the foundation of his 200 or so asana repertoire. Competence with this group of poses will ideally help in your practice of all the rest. Please come to class prepared to work intensely, not only physically but mentally as well.

Saturday~ 9 – 11:00 am
Pranayama & Philosophy Part One

For centuries, the Yogis have developed pranayama, the “expansion and restraint” (ayama) of the “life energy” (prana), as a means of self-study and self-realization. While formal pranayama may take years to fully master, its basic methods are easily learned and can immediately “breathe life” into an asana or meditation practice.

This workshop is for new pranayama students who want a framework and direction for adding the practice to their daily yoga routine, and for more experienced students who want to re-inspire their practice with a review of breathing basics. We’ll talk about the teachings of the Hatha Yoga “model” of pranayama; work with several useful pranayama preparations based on simple asanas; and acquaint ourselves with a few simple breathing techniques and two foundation breaths, the Conqueror (ujjayi) and Against-the-Grain (viloma).

Saturday ~ 1 – 4:00 pm
Inversions & the Controversy Behind Them

The North American yoga world was recently embroiled in a controversy over yoga inversions, specifically Shoulder Stand (sarvangasana) and Head Stand (shirshasana). Several teachers in the US and Canada very publicly denounced inversions as being a danger to the delicate neck (cervical) vertebrae, and vowed never teach them again under any circumstances. There were, not surprisingly, strong reactions from the pro-inversion corner. Dangerous? For sure, if improperly performed. But given sufficient training, close monitoring from an experienced teacher, and consistent practice, most students should ideally be able to safely and sanely perform these inversions, whether in the traditional way (with the body weight bearing on the neck) or bolstered by various props (and little or no weight on the neck).

If you are a reasonably experienced student (at least six months of regular class attendance) and would like to add inversions to your practice, or if you are a teacher who would value several tried and true methods to bring inversions to your students, then this workshop is recommended.

NB: you’ll be asked to make a solemn pledge to 1) NEVER to perform Shoulder Stand without a sufficient blanket support for your shoulders (usually consisting of 3-5 firm folded blankets); and 2) ALWAYS be regular in your practice of traditional Head Stand (crown on the floor with at least some of your body’s weight on the neck), at least 3-4 times a week for 1-3 minutes each time.

You do not have to have a current headstand practice to take this workshop.

Sunday ~ 8 – 10:00 am
Pranayama & Philosophy Part Two

For centuries, the Yogis have developed pranayama, the “expansion and restraint” (ayama) of the “life energy” (prana), as a means of self-study and self-realization. While formal pranayama may take years to fully master, its basic methods are easily learned and can immediately “breathe life” into an asana or meditation practice.

This workshop is for new pranayama students who want a framework and direction for adding the practice to their daily yoga routine, and for more experienced students who want to re-inspire their practice with a review of breathing basics. We’ll talk about the teachings of the Hatha Yoga “model” of pranayama; work with several useful pranayama preparations based on simple asanas; and acquaint ourselves with a few simple breathing techniques and two foundation breaths, the Conqueror (ujjayi) and Against-the-Grain (viloma).

Sunday ~ 12 – 3:00 pm
Growing Up in Backbends

Most beginning students with at least six months consistent practice have at least some familiarity with what are called in certain yoga circles, the baby back bends. These include Locust (shalabha), Sea Monster (makara), and what’s typically called Bridge (setu bandha). If there are baby back bends, then we might reasonably expect there are adult ones too. And indeed there are, beginning with Camel (ushtrasana), which is more like a teenager, and Upward Bow (urdhva dhanurasana), a full-blown grown-up.

Have you ever wanted to try an adult back bend but weren’t sure how to begin and what to do? Or have you ever been in a class where adult back bends were being taught, and found it nigh impossible to work your way into them? A sure recipe for frustration. This class will give you the tools you need to grow up in back bends, perhaps not in class but, with persistent practice sometime in the near future. Recommended for students with at least 6 months regular class attendance, and no serious chronic or immediate pair.

Richard Rosen is world renowned for his expertise in asana and pranayama and his engaging teaching style. He began his practice in 1980, and graduated from the Iyengar Yoga Institute of San Francisco in 1985. The author of five books on yoga, he is also a contributing editor with Yoga Journal.

Richard’s most recent book is “Yoga FAQ” – Almost Everything You Need to Know About Yoga – from Asanas to Yamas.”  Other books he has written are Original Yoga, The Yoga of Breath, Pranayama beyond the Fundamentals, and The Practice of Pranayama. 

COST: Early-bird discount $330 by July 31; $380 thereafter ($50 Savings)
Individual sessions are available if space permits. 2-hr session $66, 3-hr session $99.

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